The Betraying Voice Card Trick

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The Betraying Voice Card Trick

For this card trick, the spectator divides the pack into several piles on the table. He takes any card from any heap, replaces it on any pile, and then replaces the piles on top of that.

Turning his back, the performer instructs the spectator to deal out the cards one at a time, naming each one. The performer interjects and names the chosen card, explaining that the spectator’s voice betrayed the card as he named it.

The Method

The cards have been prearranged in some way.

Place six cards of any suit on top of the pack, and six cards of the same suit on the bottom. Keep the thirteenth card of that suit in your pocket or card case until later.

Request that the spectator deal the pack into six piles on the table, one at a time, face down, from left to right, until the entire pack has been dealt in this manner. Now, unknown to the spectators, you have one card of the same suit at the bottom and top of each pile, and the success of the trick is dependent on this fact.

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A card is taken from one heap and replaced on another. The remaining heaps are piled on top in any order.

The spectator deals the cards one by one, naming each one as he goes. The chosen card will now be sandwiched between two cards of your chosen suit and will be the only one found between two cards of that suit.

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Assume your suit is hearts; when the spectator names “two of hearts, five of clubs, eight of hearts,” you know the chosen card must be the five of clubs; so, wait until a few more cards are called, then stop him and name his card.

Note: Instead of secretly setting aside the thirteenth suit card and secretly returning it to the pack after the trick is complete, you may proceed as follows: “For this trick, we use six piles of cards, so in order to have piles of the same number, we need only forty-eight cards, and will discard four, temporarily; the four sevens will do as well as any, and that will be one of each suit.”

This allows the withheld cards to be openly added to the pack at the end of the trick, as well as ensuring that the six piles “come out even” when the spectator deals them out.